Unserious

Give Me The Weird: Infusing Play into our Work and Teams with Lauren Cooke

December 07, 2023 J.B. Skelton and Molly McMahon Season 1 Episode 5
Unserious
Give Me The Weird: Infusing Play into our Work and Teams with Lauren Cooke
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Research shows that joy and high performance are tightly correlated, so it's worth asking: why don't we play more? And how can the power of play help us produce better, more innovative, and more personally satisfying work? In this episode, J.B. and Molly speak with Lauren Cooke, the creative director behind diverse brands like Alamo Drafthouse, Mondo, Snap Kitchen, and Bestow Life Insurance. Her insights reveal the transformative power of joy and play in creating ideas that are just weird enough to connect with. We also dive into the stickiness of using AI to drive creativity and close with thoughts on working with or being introverts in the creative process. Grab some Play-Doh for this one!

"You have to consciously decide to carve out time to be silly, to do something weird... Going through some paths that won't work out makes the final product sing." - Lauren Cooke

0:13 Intro
3:20 Give Me The Weird
6:49 Hire, Fire, Boss!
12:11 Encouraging Play in the Workplace
19:17 Introverts in Structured Brainstorms
22:02 On Ambition
24:52 AI's Impact on Art and Creativity
31:05 Reflections and outro

Check out Lauren's clay animations on Instagram and connect on LinkedIn.

Mentioned in this episode:
- Lauren's favorite fidget clay (don't forget the eyeballs)

Follow Unserious in your podcast app, at unserious.com, and on Instagram and Threads at @unserious.fun.

J.B.:

This is Unserious. In 25 years of working, I know this much to be true. Joy and high performance are tightly correlated, but don't take my word for it. Harvard Business Review agrees with me. Joy and high performance are critical attributes of the most creative teams in the world. Joyful Workplaces see reduced turnover, higher productivity, better safety and greater collaboration. They also have happier employees, and it won't shock anyone that happier employees are more creative, innovative and dedicated. Some of the leaders I admire most use play to weave joy into their creative processes and outputs. They're also the leaders I would work for again in the heartbeat. So it's worth asking how can play help our teams produce better, more innovative and more personally satisfying work? Our guest today likes to get shit done and have fun often at the same time. Lauren Cook is a creative director, designer and marketer behind such brands as Bestow, snap Kitchen, alamo, draft House and its sister brand, mondo. Lauren is also a generative and playful maker who can't be contained by her day job alone. She's executive, produced short films, sews handmade goods and produces incredibly fun stop motion videos. Lauren, thank you for joining us today from sunny Austin, texas.

Lauren:

Oh, thank you, I'm happy to be here.

J.B.:

So you're working in life insurance? At Bestow, consumer products, at Snap Kitchen.

Lauren:

Yes, some fun, easy to heat up meals.

J.B.:

Entertainment and hospitality over at Alamo Draft House.

Molly:

Fan favorite.

J.B.:

And Mondo it's the one that we're most familiar with because we have an Alamo Draft House here in the mission but, like these are all really different companies where you've led creative teams and you're the common denominator so far as I could tell, the only common denominator. What is the through line to all of this? What is your ethos for work?

Lauren:

I think I am definitely a curious person, so I'm going to just be interested in a whole new thing, like throw something new at me and that's going to be the exciting part of it. I want to learn a whole new industry. I knew nothing about life insurance when I joined Bestow. I was just fully ignorant, but it was a great team. They have taught me so much. I now understand the basics of underwriting and how it all works and the value that it brings, and I think getting to have those opportunities to work in a different industry often is always exciting. So I think I'll keep doing that in my career. I'd love to keep bouncing around.

Molly:

Yeah, I totally get that. I'm starting a new position right now and I'm loving it and what I like is that I'm just on like steep learning curve and I always find that it's sort of like visiting another country or traveling to another part of the world, and so I'm curious, with all this whimsy and creativity that you have, you do your videos, you sew, you've had an Etsy store how does that come into your world of work?

Lauren:

I think it just kind of gets forced out of me. I can't help myself when it comes to whimsy and creativity. I'm going to figure out a way to make something playful, because I think joy is such a great emotion to share and to create, and so if I can find that element within a cute little photo shoot that has a microwave meal, I'll do that at Snap.

Molly:

But yeah, it's something.

Lauren:

at Alamo, where we're man, we were creating joy all the time. I mean, it was it's entertainment. That's lovely. It's been a challenge in life insurance, since it's such a serious topic. How do we bring in that joy and that playfulness? But I think a lot of it is like. Humans relate to joy, they relate to play. We've all been kids once, so going back to some foundational kid feelings sometimes, I think, is a really powerful way to get your message out there.

Molly:

Do you do that through, like the work that you create or how you interact with your team members?

Lauren:

Both, I think. My work, naturally, will always skew to that whimsy, I think. For my team I push to give me the weird yeah.

Molly:

We often. That sounds also very Austin to me.

Lauren:

Give me the weird yeah Like well, we'll often have a brief that is pretty straightforward. Give me an email for one of our retargeting campaigns and we're hitting the brief. We've, you know, crossed all of the T's, all that, but where's the life in it? Am I connecting to it? Not necessarily, so we might have to come back and be like, okay, I want something bonkers, like, make me crazy, make me not feel like we're sane people. I want something weird, and oftentimes it's the weird thing that we're going to end up going with, because that's the thing that's fun. It's a delicious little message that relates to people at Alamo. Every year there's a Christmas gift card campaign. How do we make it interesting every? year You're here to sell movies, but you've kind of got a pretty big sandbox to play in, because movies are broad, there's a whole bunch of them. You can do whatever you want. And so we had to, like we got to figure out, okay, what can be a relatable thing that we can still get away with from an IP situation, because we're not going to, like you know, be able to get Arnold Schwarzenegger to say boy lollible, drothal evil. That was a terrible impression. Oh no it was great.

Molly:

We want more.

Lauren:

Oh boy. But yeah, we had to stick within those. Like, we had to figure out how we can still be weird but still get references that people will get there. So we got weird with props. We used a rubber horse head and stuffed it and bloodied it and made it a. Godfather reference, because that could be a gift for someone.

Molly:

You might find it in your bed on Christmas morning.

J.B.:

That's quite a shocking suffer.

Lauren:

That one was a special project to just get to really try to figure out how we can make a reference while staying within the bounds of what we can do legally and all that copyright no-transcript.

J.B.:

This is. This is a podcast about play today and we are going to play a game. Have you ever played on Mary Shaggerkill? Oh yeah, Of course.

Lauren:

I'm nervous.

J.B.:

Well, this one we call hire, fire boss. So we're going to give you three people who you have to slot into someone that you want to hire, somebody that you would fire and somebody that will be your boss. So I heard from the grapevine that you are a fan of RuPaul's Drag Race. Is that right? Oh yeah, all right. So, oh no. So Jinx monsoon, trixie Mattel or Alaska Thunderfuck.

Lauren:

Okay, I would hire Jinx, because Jinx can do anything. She can do anything, but she also probably needs someone to boss her around a little bit. You know, kind of I think she needs some structure, kind of like Dayla gives her some structure. Yeah, trixie, I would, I would work for Really.

J.B.:

Definitely you would, you would fire Alaska.

Lauren:

I'd fire Alaska. Like Alaska is great, Alaska is, you know, legendary. I'm like she also is a drama starter. Come on.

J.B.:

Fair enough.

Molly:

JB, how about you?

J.B.:

I mean I think I would. I would flip Trixie in Alaska. I would, I would fire Trixie and hot and want to work for Alaska.

Lauren:

Like Trixie is like a mogul Is that the word? I always get them.

J.B.:

Alaska is kind of a mogul too and they're all kind of at this point.

Lauren:

Oh, like Trixie's got like TV shows.

J.B.:

That's true.

Lauren:

Makeup line, a whole hotel. She a lot she is Lovely.

Molly:

All right, my turn. But now we're going to think about professional women in the workplace, because Fictional professional women though. Oh for frictional yeah.

Lauren:

I was like I'm going to burn someone.

Molly:

I know, oh yeah, fictional professional women in the workplace because we are working women, designing women. Oh yeah, let's get our shoulder pads on. Yeah, let's do this. So the options are Elle Woods from Legally Blonde. Tess McGill from Working Girl Jamie, no influencing.

Lauren:

If you say the next one. I just hope it's not that, because it might be.

Molly:

The next one is Jane Craig from Broadcast News.

Lauren:

Okay, I literally have a picture of her on my desk.

Molly:

Oh, you do. Oh, she's my idol. Oh yeah, Holly Hunter yeah.

Lauren:

So she's my boss. Clearly she like literally knows how to do anything in that movie, like Accept, capture the heart of William Hurt. I mean she does.

Molly:

And then she dumps him because he has loose morals. She's a working woman. She doesn't have time for that, yeah.

Lauren:

Oh, I love her so much. Yeah, she's, she's a boss. She knows how to get it done, she knows how to give direct feedback, she knows how she has some emotional intelligence. You know, like unhooking the phone, having a good cry, getting back to her. You know, boss self.

J.B.:

Yeah, no, I'm. I'm so aligned with you on this, yeah.

Lauren:

I guess I have to. Oh gosh, I don't know who I'd fire because L is so great. Maybe I will, maybe I'll. I'll fire L because she would easily like land somewhere else. And she would come back to me in a fabulous outfit and she would say something so witty and quippy yeah.

Molly:

She'd snap back her hair and her ponytail and she'd be just fine, yeah.

J.B.:

Happy people don't kill people, they don't.

Lauren:

Endorphins make you happy. So you would want to work with Tess McGill oh yeah, every every day, and then I'd probably end up like trying to adopt a Jersey accent that she has.

J.B.:

Staten Island.

Lauren:

Staten Island.

J.B.:

Yeah.

Lauren:

Yes, yes, I forget which fairy is.

J.B.:

Staten Island fairy, it's the Staten Island.

Molly:

Yeah, and you know, harrison Ford is still my heart.

Lauren:

Yeah, I could like run in and be buds with him and be like oh hey, did you bring an extra lunchbox?

J.B.:

Can you go change your shirt in the glass conference room again?

Molly:

Yeah, there's just like heart bubbles shooting off over my head.

J.B.:

I really wish that we could afford better music for this podcast, because this is when I would let play Carly Simon. Let the river run, I don't even.

Lauren:

He can vomit for a certain amount of time.

J.B.:

Oh, no, you're not allowed to Y'all, I'm crying. I'm a little overclimbed. I feel empowered, so we know that play makes us more creative, it makes us better problem solvers, it fosters imagination, it reduces stress, it makes us better communicators as well. We have, like, more social interaction, we collaborate, there's improvisation to play and there's a good deal of self expression that you bring to it. So how do you get to that? So how do you, day to day, encourage play on your teams, especially when it's high pressure stuff?

Lauren:

You have to consciously decide to carve out time to be silly to do something weird. I made a Slack game on Alamo called a one word movie game and the premise is you give one one movie clue, one word, and people try to guess the movie and it just is a whole bunch of threads of people trying to guess and it's just a fun little way for all of us remotely to kind of connect in and play a quick thing. But the game lasts like maybe 10 minutes maybe. Yeah, that was kind of one of the ways that we create play. At Bistot, my lovely boss Jill Bradley, we do a bi-weekly session called Creative Chaos where we are given a prompt in the morning and then by the end of the day we have to have a presentation prepared for it. So, and it can be anything like Bistot is gonna have a mascot now, like a mask lack or whatever. Figure out the mascot. I don't imagine Bistot is gonna have a mascot anytime soon. Yeah, but it's a really fun exercise. It gets us out of our comfort zone and we have to think quickly. We have to practice our presentation skills. I think that's a big thing that every creative needs to practice, that in-house creatives don't necessarily get to have access to as much as an agency creative might, yeah.

Molly:

So I think I'd be really curious to hear, like process-wise, I come from a design thinking background, so I think about what are all the different moments in the process, what are those key milestones as a team? So I'm curious, what's the role of play in creating these like weird and bonkers and fabulous end experiences and products. What's the journey you go on with your team as a leader?

Lauren:

I mean, projects are wonderfully different sometimes. That you're gonna receive them in all kinds of ways, yeah. But if it starts from a brief, it's gonna go through a couple of different like people. It's either gonna hit your copywriter, it's gonna hit your designer, hit an art director if we ever got to have one of those again.

J.B.:

You will, you will.

Lauren:

Yeah. So it starts kind of in that fun phase of ideation what we do sometimes with even a little campaign, even if it's just making some social media posts for the next month, instead of siloing it out and having one person kind of have to grind through those ideas, we have a fun meeting. Let's put a fig jam together. Let's make a way to contest this out so it can make up some completely bonkers ones that compliance would completely never allow us to use. We have a Grim Reaper campaign just waiting to be used. I think life insurance probably wouldn't. It's not ready for it, it's not ready for it.

Molly:

Not ready for it.

Lauren:

Not ready for public use.

Molly:

No, but it makes us feel good.

Lauren:

But I think and having those exercises where you're spending the time going down some paths that like won't work out, still makes the final product sing a little bit better.

Molly:

Yeah, I love that, sitting inside of IDEO, the different design teams, I feel like, had rituals and practices around creative warmups, or it'd be like lunchtime creative activities and I always felt like it was almost like a point of pride between the different teams, the type of warmups or activities they do. And so every now and then there'd be like a confetti cannon that would shoot off and one team would be like, oh, that team is getting their creative warmup on. Or another team would show up with some costumes, or you'd hear people recording poetry or haikus they'd done in the morning and so even thinking, I do feel like it was like a badge of honor to be part of those creative processes. And you're such a creative Maven we talked about earlier, but you have these amazing stop motion videos. Is it true that you mold clay while you're in meetings too? What's the deal with clay? What's the deal with?

Lauren:

clay. What's the deal with clay?

Molly:

What's the deal with clay? Yes, I do.

Lauren:

Oh, you've got clay in your hands. I always have clay with me.

Molly:

Oh my gosh Listeners, she has clay in her hands right now it's happened.

Lauren:

The clay is out. The clay is always out. It's, I mean, honestly like if anyone needs a really quiet, good fidget type of tool, if they're a fidgeter and I most certainly am I always have clay around me. It's a nice grounding thing, and when you're especially in a meeting that maybe could have been an email, it's especially nice to just mold some clay while you're while you're going through that thing, I love that.

Molly:

What are you molding right now with your clay while we're chatting?

Lauren:

Typically, when I'm chatting, I'm just making squiggles.

J.B.:

Yeah, no, that's. I was like that was a worm. Molly, that was a worm. She showed it to you. I saw the worm.

Lauren:

Here's one of the. It's just with us.

J.B.:

Nice.

Lauren:

Yeah, I've got some other dudes hanging out ready to get animated at some point.

J.B.:

What were your other favorite toys when you were a kid?

Lauren:

Oddly. I mean, play-doh was certainly there, clay is recent, clay is great.

J.B.:

I ate the Play-Doh because it was salty. I really like salty stuff.

Lauren:

I'm hoping they've like changed the taste.

J.B.:

Yeah, I know it seems like it. I mean I'm hoping it's non-toxic, but you shouldn't eat it. Kids don't eat the Play-Doh. Micah's feeding me a line that it all turned out OK and I was like I'm actually not sure it did turn out all OK. The reason I didn't I didn't go to Harvard was because of the Play-Doh. It was definitely, definitely the Play-Doh.

Molly:

I love it. I love it. Have you noticed any creative habits that your team members have? Are they molding clay? What are your peeps doing to stay engaged and interested in the work? Yeah, I'm going to out my peeps here.

Lauren:

We've got a potter. Oh, she does pottery. That's her kind of side thing. She also bakes. We've got one who makes puppets.

Molly:

Oh yeah, oh my gosh. It seems like you guys could put on a little playhouse, or between the videos and the puppets.

Lauren:

Yeah, my goal is to just create a theater company with all of my graphic designers and copywriters, and they'll just somehow love to perform and it'll be this magical adventure. Do it. I do think we underestimate the amount of introverted creatives there are, and I am one of them.

J.B.:

Why is that?

Lauren:

Well, I think creativity doesn't fall on that. I think it falls anywhere on that spectrum. It works regardless. It's wonderful that way.

Molly:

What would be your wisdom for introverted creatives? Because if you're looking in the agency world, where you are constantly client-oriented and personal brand matters, which tends to be sort of an extroverted skill set, what would be your wisdom for supporting introverted creatives and helping them do their best work on extroverted teams?

Lauren:

Yeah, I think you have to rethink brainstorms Completely. If you just do a brainstorm in what maybe people think of a regular place, like we're all sitting in a room and just throwing out ideas, like that is an extroverts palace. What I've done is make structured brainstorms. So we'll set up a fake jam. We'll set up the questions and we'll give them a day, maybe two days in advance for them to kind of think through responses and let them ruminate. Oftentimes that's what they're going to need in order to actually show up. We do the same thing in our creative chaos, where we get a prompt, but then they get the time that they need by themselves to figure it out and hash through stuff, not in a public way.

J.B.:

I think that's really wise. The best ideas very rarely come out in an active brainstorm. They happen like two or three days later.

Lauren:

After you figured out that that one idea was not great.

J.B.:

Exactly, and you just start building on that or something that annoying that somebody said that was like this just like starts gnawing at you and you go off on a different direction. I think that that time to sit with the questions is really important, so that's a practice that I think that I'll bring into my own work.

Molly:

Yeah, absolutely. And when you think about yourself as like a leading team, what do you think your introvert superpower is? What's different? I don't know, this could be my own biases, but extroverted folks might be the ones that are climbing the ladder. And so how do you lead as an introvert?

Lauren:

It's a struggle, I feel like for most introverts. It's hard to see their ambition easily. Because an extroverted one is going to put it on a billboard right behind them and you're going to know that, ok, they want to be a creative director someday. Let's put them down that path. I think one-on-ones are always really important. That's where you can have those conversations, that's where an introvert can thrive and they can be able to share what they're really wanting to do. And I think nowadays, ambition isn't necessarily something that is something that people are striving for, or it's a different ambition. I guess it's not. Oh, I need to get that promotion, I need to get that title. It's. I want my balance, I want boundaries, and I think that's an interesting turning point.

Molly:

I mean, I know JB and I have had these conversations as friends around. I think it's age where we are in our career, where we are in our lives so much that we learned during COVID about life improving in some interesting ways, where there's some dark moments, oh yeah, but those dark moments created some real shifts and how I'm living and the way I'm working and the type of work I want to be doing. I think it's one of the reasons we actually started Unserious just wanting to work and learn and be in the world in different ways and have the chance to learn from folks like you, which is a different type of ambition than being like I got to get myself into the C-suite. Are you seeing that also on your teams and friends in the Austin area?

Lauren:

Yeah, I feel like I especially see it interestingly with my younger creatives, those in their 20s. I just remember being in my 20s and thinking I got to move up, I got to get, I got to level up. I need to get to the next thing and I have found that a lot of my younger creatives that I know they don't exhibit that need to become an art director. They're very happy as a graphic designer. They're very happy in that role. If it's feeding them, giving them what they need, and they're able to kind of live their life, I think it's very impressive. I still struggle with it. I think about those levels more than I want to.

J.B.:

Yeah, well, there's a culture I mean at lots of different companies there's an up or out culture where, no matter how much you love the problem and are talented in addressing it, if you're not leveling up you're not growing, which is a false thought.

Lauren:

Yeah Well, and I think there's ways to encourage development outside of the level up.

J.B.:

Completely.

Molly:

And it kind of goes back to your original discussion around the importance of joy and how play and creativity and that whimsy is creates a joyful environment and experience and how important that is for the best creative work.

J.B.:

Yeah.

Molly:

Yeah, back with more in just a moment. So you are in the creative field and the creative field is being really kind of rocked right now by the world of AI, and so you know, speaking of play at work, are you or your teams playing with generative AI tools like mid journey, dolly chat, gpt, in the creative process or just for fun?

Lauren:

Yes, I'm pretty sure our copywriter just made like a horse head Elvis for some fun project. Yeah, yeah, we certainly play with them. We certainly use them as a rubber duck. I think that's the phrase. I don't know what a rubber duck is yeah.

J.B.:

What do you mean by that?

Lauren:

It comes from. So it comes from, I think, like an engineering side of things. So you would put a rubber duck on your desk and if you had a question, instead of asking your fellow engineer, you would ask the duck first. And typically, if you're just vocalizing your problem, you're figuring out the solution as you're vocalizing it. So I often use, like chat, gpt as a rubber duck.

Molly:

Totally.

Lauren:

And it's probably going to give me the worst answer, because it still doesn't really know creativity yet, which is comforting, but it's also a yet, yeah.

J.B.:

Do you think this is going to obscure individuality and uniqueness?

Lauren:

We're getting into such a weird area, I think, especially on visual AI tools like mid journey, it's literally learning from other people's art, and so how is it going to make any original art? Really, that seems very ethically dubious. I do feel like us humans are still going to keep making original art. I mean, I work in stop motion and that art form died when ILM started making CGI stuff. So I still feel confident in humans that they're still going to figure out how to make art, with and without it. But there's the question of who owns what. It's really interesting because, like from a creative director standpoint, I give that to an artist, I say I want XYZ. I say I want you to do all this and this is what I'm thinking, and then they produce and I refine and we go from there. Asking that to a computer is not that different, yeah, but I still feel like that's stealing from a whole bunch of legitimate artists who worked hours and hours and hours and hours refining their skill. And I'm getting this in seconds. That's creepy.

J.B.:

So you've got young up and coming designers and marketers on your team. What is your advice for how they harness AI to improve their work and improve the process in the outputs?

Lauren:

Yeah, I think they absolutely need to learn it because, like, the more that they can figure out how to articulate what they're wanting the AI to output, they will make better work. So they need to at least learn the skill because, like, the industry is going to keep moving with it, what?

Molly:

do you think about for, like new folks who are new in their creative careers, if AI can do the work, how do you get your 10,000 hours in? So you get to be great, because that's where things become really interesting is as you are further along in your career and you know what good looks like and you know how to create those emotional connections and give them the weird. What would be your wisdom for those young folks?

Lauren:

I legitimately feel scared. I feel scared for the junior creative, for the junior engineer. I got my start because we needed someone to retouch things at Alamo, like I needed to be able to resize banners, yeah and so I feel nervous about companies still having jobs like that. I still think if they're staying curious about it and if they're relentlessly curious with it and wanting to learn and always learn a new skill, you're going to get your 10,000 hours in anyway. Maybe you're going to be an amazing AI artist. Maybe I wouldn't shy away from the tech, but I'd also not rely on it.

J.B.:

Yeah.

Lauren:

It's a weird time.

J.B.:

It is, but we've had these weird times before. I mean, there was pre-digital art. It's hard to remember that, but like pre-1995, people in design roles didn't practice their craft on computers generally.

Lauren:

Yeah, they had drafting boards.

J.B.:

And there was a very niche field of, like graphic designers. Remember graphic design?

Lauren:

Oh yeah, and they were a lot of them dudes.

J.B.:

And they were like the dude with the Mac.

Lauren:

Yes, the dude with the Mac. Oh yeah, it is an interesting time where I always think about when stop motion, when stop motion stopped being the way for special effects and it went to computer generated art, and that was scary. And I still feel because I'm like, oh, think about all those model makers and sculptor artists that don't have jobs. They'll figure it out, they'll like people will bounce back. We are amazingly resilient.

J.B.:

We are. I remain more of an optimist here and I think that, like we will see this, we will experience another massive shift, but I think that there are outcomes that we haven't imagined yet that will take us in a new direction, which is interesting and fun and keeps me motivated to keep having conversations like this and learning more. Lauren, this has been such a fantastic conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today and thank you for sharing all of these strategies for helping teams be more creative and playful. Where can people find more out about you online?

Lauren:

Yeah, if you want to see some weird clay videos, you can follow me at lopsidedloren, I think, on both TikTok and Instagram, or you can connect with me on LinkedIn or something. Be fun.

J.B.:

Fabulous. Thank you so much. I hope you have a great weekend.

Lauren:

Yeah, you too.

J.B.:

God, that was a great conversation. I completely related to Lauren's ethos of seeking out new and different experiences over the course of a career Totally. I think getting into new spaces, new industries and solving new problems, where we get to learn and experiment and grow, is such an interesting way to thread together the arc of a career. It seems counterintuitive, but being that serial beginner is actually a great way to develop really real, deep wisdom really quickly. I kept hearing that wisdom come through in our conversation with Lauren.

Molly:

Yeah, I love that.

J.B.:

I also really like to approach to experimenting with AI as a rubber duck. I'd never heard that term before Me. Neither I agree with her that AI is not yet ready to replace human artistic creativity Right now. All of these AGI platforms rely on vocabulary, and the creative vocabulary of professional artists, professional designers, professional writers and creatives is so much richer than it is for non-professionals. If you're expecting magic from AI, one great way to get that magic is to hire a great creative.

Molly:

A thousand percent.

J.B.:

Also, I'm ready to go rewatch broadcast news this weekend. I need to go re-familiarize myself with Jane Craig.

Molly:

Oh my gosh, me too, no doubt Lauren truly is a mix of Jane Craig meets Tess McGill.

Lauren:

I kept thinking when she was talking.

Molly:

Can I be her when I grow up? Because I got quieter, I got more curious. I felt like sparks of joy as I heard her talk about how she catalyzes amazing work and creativity on her diverse teams and I really loved the focus on the power of creative introverts. Then I also wouldn't it be really cool if I made a cameo appearance in one of her stop motion films? A little claymation Molly. I think that would be pretty boss. I think the whole world needs that. Totally, and I think bonkers might have to become a new criteria for joy for me. If I'm going to measure joy in my life, how bonkers do I feel? How bonkers was it? Yeah, and get ready, because give me the weird is going to be my new mantra. Good, we might hear it again here on Unserious Give me the weird. Fasten your seatbelts, folks.

J.B.:

I ate the play dough because it was salty Kids don't eat the play dough.

Intro
Give Me The Weird
Hire, Fire, Boss!
Encouraging Play in the Workplace
Introverts in Structured Brainstorms
On Ambition
AI's Impact on Art and Creativity
Reflections and outro